Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

What does the CCC do? Where can I buy clean clothes? What should a company do? Please find the most commonly asked questions here.

How has CCC succeeded in the fight to improve working conditions?

Each year, dozens of organisations and workers seek our action and support in cases of labour and human rights violations. With persistence from workers, consumers, CCC and its partners, we are proud to see many of these cases through to settlement. The impact of our international solidarity has reinstated fired workers, released imprisoned labour activists, recognised labour unions, and improved health and safety conditions in garment factories.

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How does CCC approach its work in the garment sector?

At CCC, we take action for garment workers within four areas of opportunity:

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Why does CCC focus on clothing and sportswear?

The garment industry was one of the first industries to globalise and to become transnational. It developed into one of the most detrimental industries in terms of working rights for the people making our clothes, and is in the top five of most polluting industries.

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Where can I find information on specific brands and their labour practices?

You can use the search function on our website to find past and present violations of labour rights and the specific brands who were/are involved, as well as general information about the garment industry and the worker experience.

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Workers' wages do seem low – but isn't the cost of living more affordable in garment-producing countries?

In comparison to the global north, garment-producing countries do yield a lower cost-of-living. That figure, however, does not represent a garment workers’ wage by proportion.

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Can’t we rely on governments to enforce and regulate work conditions?

All governments have a responsibility to protect workers and their rights, to regulate companies and foreign investments, as is stated in the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

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What should a brand do when its supply chain violates human rights or labour standards?

When this happens, it’s the brand’s cue to take responsibility and make changes.

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Brands don’t hire garment workers; supply management does. So why should the brand be responsible for factory working conditions?

After leaving the hands of a garment worker, your clothes ship from buyer to buyer until a retailer sells them to you for a tiny profit. With so many people involved in the supply chain, CCC and many other influential institutions, such as the UN expects brands to uphold labour standards in every phase. Brands are able to make sure that the same kind t-shirts are made, shipped and sold all over the world and meticulously control the quality of their product. Why do they claim they cannot exercise the same amount of scrutiny when it comes to labour conditions?

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Where can I buy 'clean' clothes?

At Clean Clothes Campaign, we believe that you, both with your consumer and citizen power, can play a significant role in the fate of the garment industry. Because your purchases matter to brands, your voice will as well. As a citizen, you can use your voice to let brands and governments know you want fair working conditions for the people making our clothes.

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Some brands claim to audit their suppliers for labour violations on a regular basis. Are they telling the truth?

The majority of today’s brands and retailers participate in one monitoring program or another. Indeed, a global industry of commercial ‘social auditing’ firms has emerged – but not all fulfill a benefit for workers.

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What conventions and core labour standards does the International Labour Organisation (ILO) protect?

As part of the United Nations, the International Labour Organisation (ILO) is a tripartite organisation of trade unions, governments and companies.

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When I buy a garment, what portion of the cost goes to workers? Are 'clean clothes' more expensive than the alternative?

While labour costs may vary, average wages for production scarcely exceed 3% of the price you will pay in the shop– for low-price items from budget brands, and even less for an item from a luxury fashion brand.

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What is a code of conduct and why should brands have one?

At CCC, we define a brand’s code of conduct as the detailed standards to which it holds its supplier(s) accountable. Brands are adopting this tool in response to our campaigning late 90swith other labour rights organisations. Nowadays, nearly all brands have a code of conduct.

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How is CCC structured?

CCC is a global alliance of autonomous national coalitions with an international Office in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

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