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Zara, Next, Mango Slammed for Leaving Workers Without Wages in Turkish Factory
by Christie Miedema published 25-09-2017 — filed under: , , ,
Workers at the Bravo Tekstil factory complex in Istanbul, Turkey are demanding their back wages and severance after working without payment for three months followed by the sudden shutdown of their factory. As the factory was producing for the apparel brand giants Zara, Next, and Mango, Clean Clothes Campaign supports the workers’ demand that these brands take responsibility and pay up.
Located in News / / 09 / 25
Brands must intervene to win release of imprisoned labour leaders in Bangladesh
by Mirjam van Heugten published 19-01-2017 last modified 31-01-2017 15:33 — filed under: , , , , , ,
Twenty-two human and labour rights organizations from around the world are calling on H&M, C&A, Inditex, Gap and VF to press for the release of unjustly imprisoned Bangladeshi union leaders and worker rights advocates and the reinstatement of 1,500 workers suspended or terminated for taking part in a wage strike. Sign the petition!
Located in News / / 01 / 19
File ECMAScript program Invisible workers - Syrian refugees in Turkish garment factories
by Christie Miedema published 18-01-2017 last modified 18-01-2017 08:34 — filed under: , , ,
Thousands of Syrian refugees work long hours in Turkey’s apparel factories in unhealthy conditions with salaries below the minimum wage. Despite Turkey being an important sourcing market for the Nordic brands H&M, KappAhl, Lindex, Gina Tricot and Varner (BikBok, Cubus, Carlings et al), the companies are not doing enough to prevent discrimination of Syrians in their supply chains, according to this report by Fair Action and Future in our hands published in January 2017.
Located in Resources / Publications from National CCCs
Nordic fashion brands need to tackle abuse of Syrian refugees in Turkish garment factories
by Christie Miedema published 18-01-2017 last modified 18-01-2017 09:00 — filed under: , , ,
Thousands of Syrian refugees work long hours in Turkey’s apparel factories in unhealthy conditions with salaries below the minimum wage. Despite Turkey being an important sourcing market for the Nordic brands H&M, KappAhl, Lindex, Gina Tricot and Varner (BikBok, Cubus, Carlings et al), the companies are not doing enough to prevent discrimination of Syrians in their supply chains, according to a report by Fair Action and Future in our hands.
Located in News / / 01 / 18
Bangladeshi garment workers face mass firings and criminal charges
by Mirjam van Heugten published 05-01-2017 last modified 05-01-2017 14:51 — filed under: , , , , , ,
Since last month's wage protests began in Dhaka, Bangladesh thousands of workers along with several grass-roots worker organizations located in the region faced a series of repressive actions from their employers and the government. An estimated 2 - 3000 workers were fired, while numerous legal cases filed at the Ashulia police station accuse at least 1,500 unnamed workers and 150 named workers of vandalism, looting, threatening other workers, and assaulting factory officials. At least 13 union leaders and activists, many of whom had no association with the protests, were detained or arrested. As of January 4, 2017, at least 11 remain in police custody.
Located in News / / 01 / 05
Victory: Company drops legal case against Romanian journalist reporting on dire working conditions
by Christie Miedema published 22-12-2016 last modified 04-01-2017 16:38 — filed under: , ,
An international campaign convinced the Italian-owned factory Maglierie Cristian Impex in Romania to drop the trial against a Romanian investigative journalist for reporting on dire working conditions in one of the largest producers of garments in Romania. The factory employs around 900 people and produces for luxury brands such as Tommy Hilfiger, Marco Polo and LaCoste, but also for high street fashion brands such as Zara and Bershka.
Located in News / / 12 / 22
CCC statement on the use of Syrian workers in high street supply chains
by Mirjam van Heugten published 03-11-2016 last modified 19-04-2017 09:45 — filed under: , , , , ,
Clean Clothes Campaign welcomes the attention received by the recent BBC Panorama investigation into the exploitation of Syrian refugees, including children, within the supply chains of major European clothing retailers. We are calling on the Turkish government, the European Union and all major clothing brands to make sure adequate protections are in place that guarantee full respect of the rights of Syrian workers that will continue to be employed in the production of our clothing.
Located in News / / 11 / 03
Labour rights violations in H&M's "best in class" supplier factories in Cambodia
by Christie Miedema published 23-09-2016 last modified 23-09-2016 06:55 — filed under: , , ,
Working conditions in garment factories in Cambodia supplying H&M are far from decent even in those that H&M considers to be «best in class». This is the conclusion of a report released by Cambodian NGO Center for Alliance of Labor & Human Rights (CENTRAL) and Future In Our Hands, which represents Clean Clothes Campaign in Norway. The report «When ‘best’ is far from good enough» is based on interviews with workers and describes labour rights violations in four of H&M’s key suppliers in Cambodia.
Located in News / / 09 / 22
File Octet Stream 2016 Albania factsheet
by Christie Miedema published 20-06-2016 last modified 14-05-2019 11:11 — filed under: , ,
Located in Living Wage / Europe / Country Profiles
European garment workers face forced overtime and poverty wages
by Christie Miedema published 02-02-2016 last modified 02-02-2016 09:41 — filed under: ,
The text “Made in Europe” on a label is frequently perceived as a guarantee of good working conditions in the production of garments. However, two new country researches of Clean Clothes Campaign into working conditions in Poland and the Czech Republic show that workers in the garment industry in the European Union get poverty wages and are confronted with forced overtime which sometimes goes unpaid.
Located in News / / 02 / 02