News overview

Results: 361 Items

  • December 2, 2019

    100 civil society organisations call for EU law to address environmental and human rights abuses in corporate supply chains

    Ahead of the Finnish EU Presidency’s business and human rights event today, over 100 civil society organisations and trade unions have now signed a letter calling on the European Union to develop effective legislation, that would oblige companies and financial institutions to address the human rights and environmental impact of their global operations and supply chains.

  • November 27, 2019

    I made clothes for Uniqlo but I didn’t get paid

    I am Warni Lena from Indonesia. I made clothes for Uniqlo but I didn’t get paid. While you shop clothes at a bargain for the holiday season, there’ s a story I think you want to hear.

  • November 22, 2019

    Seven years after fatal fire, Bangladesh still provides no financial security to garment workers injured on the job

    Seven years since at least 112 workers were killed and many more injured in a fire in the Tazreen Fashions factory in Bangladesh, there is still no system in place offering financial security to workers injured at the workplace and families of workers killed on the job. If a worker loses their health or life on the job, they or their families will face the same insecurity and struggle for compensation as the Tazreen families did seven years ago. Years of planning to create a nation-wide employment injury insurance scheme have still not led to tangible results.

  • November 20, 2019

    Amazon takes transparency step

    Amazon took a useful first step toward transparency on 15 November 2019 by publicly disclosing on its website the names, addresses, and other details of over 1,000 facilities that produce Amazon-branded products, a broad coalition of human rights groups, labour rights organizations, and global unions said today. But the list is not easily accessible, sortable, or sufficiently specific to learn the type of products made in each of the listed facilities, limiting its value for consumers, workers, and labour advocates.

  • November 20, 2019

    How Inditex usurps the word ‘Respect’

    The fashion giant Inditex, which owns the brand Zara, presents itself as a transparent company that attaches the utmost importance to the people who produce its clothes. Exclusive investigation into the conditions in which one of its iconic hoodies was produced reveals what goes on behind the scenes: meagre wages, excessive hours, precarious contracts. The workers pay the price for the huge pressure to drive down prices that Inditex exerts on its suppliers in order to boost its handsome profits.

  • October 17, 2019

    Indonesian workers file FLA complaint against Uniqlo and S.Oliver

    After years in which Uniqlo refused to engage in a serious mediation process, Clean Clothes Campaign (CCC) together with the workers of the Indonesian Jaba Garmindo factory group filed a complaint with the Fair Labor Association (FLA). The complaint is directed against Fast Retailing, parent company of the Uniqlo brand, and German brand s. Oliver for violating FLA’s Workplace Code of Conduct and its “Principles of Fair Labor and Responsible sourcing”, designed to ensure the “respectful and ethical treatment of workers” and to “promote sustainable conditions” in the garment industry.

  • October 3, 2019

    Civil call for human rights and environmental due diligence legislation

    Over 80 NGOs and trade unions have called on the European Commission to bring forth this term new corporate accountability legislation requiring companies to respect human rights and the environment in their global value chains and operations. The signatories urge that victims of corporate violations should have their access to judicial remedy enhanced by the new legislation.

  • September 17, 2019

    “We go as far as brands want us to go”

    A new report launched today exposes multi-billion social auditing industry operating as corporate social responsibility (CSR) tool to protect brand reputation and profits while aggravating risks to garment workers. The report “Fig Leaf for Fashion: How social auditing protects brands and fails workers” published today by Clean Clothes Campaign offers an extensive analysis of the corporate controlled audit industry, connecting the dots between the most well known business-driven social compliance initiatives, such as Social Accountability International, WRAP, the FLA, and amfori BSCI, and the largest corporate-controlled auditing firms, including Bureau Veritas, TÜV Rheinland, UL, RINA, and ELEVATE, as well as the brand interests that they serve.

  • September 11, 2019

    Seven years after deadly fire, garment workers in Pakistan still need a worker-led factory safety programme

    Seven years since the Ali Enterprises factory fire of 2012, in which over 250 workers were killed, textile and garment factories in Pakistan remain as unsafe as they were then, warns a report launched today.

  • August 28, 2019

    G7 Fashion Deal can only be meaningful if it aligns with UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights

    This weekend, a coalition of 32 large apparel companies launched a G7 Fashion deal for sustainably produced textiles, pledging to protect the environment.

  • August 28, 2019

    New safety initiative launched in India today ignores vital lessons from the past

    A building safety initiative launching in India today, aimed at improving safety for workers in the country’s garment industry, is set on a path to ignore workers’ voices and replicate mistakes from the past. Although the “Life and Building Safety Initiative” professes to learn from the programme that made factories safe in Bangladesh after the Rana Plaza building collapse, it ignores its most vital elements.

  • July 20, 2019

    Faded denim look comes at a steep price

    Clean Clothes Campaign Turkey investigated the Turkish denim industry's use of Potassium Permanganate. Research revealed that workers use it in spray form to create the faded look in denim. The workers reported suffering skin and respiratory problems.

  • June 15, 2019

    The Bangladesh Accord continues to operate but its independence may be at risk

    As witness signatories to the Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh, we are concerned about the potential negative impact on worker safety, both short-term and long-term, of the recently concluded Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Accord and the Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association (BGMEA) and the diverging interpretations that have emerged over the last few weeks.

  • June 14, 2019

    Major brands are failing on living wage commitments

    Our latest report reveals that no major clothing brand is able to show that workers making their clothing in Asia, Africa, Central America or Eastern Europe are paid enough to escape the poverty trap. That means that apparel brands and retailers are violating internationally recognized human right norms, and their own Codes of Conduct.

  • May 21, 2019

    Questions raised after agreement reached on Bangladesh Accord

    On 19 May 2019, the Appellate Division of the Bangladesh Supreme Court accepted a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) reached earlier this month between the Bangladesh Accord Steering Committee and the Bangladesh employers’ association in the ready-made-garment sector, BGMEA.

  • May 20, 2019

    Western European brands are profiting from poverty wages in Romania: Europe’s biggest fashion manufacturer.

    Garment workers in Romanian earn a mere 14 percent of a living wage. Therefore their family members have to search for precarious jobs in Western Europe.

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